Scientists are getting proactive about self-corrections

first_img Why is it so damn hard to get a paper retracted? Journals pin corrections on scientific articles for all sorts of reasons — from the mundane, like minor typos and wording changes, to the significant, such as errors that warrant a detailed explanation.But the process for correcting a published article can be needlessly burdensome and time-consuming, and stories abound of scientists trying to do the right thing, noting a minor error or update to their own work, but facing hurdles — from delays to flat out denials from journals.Now, some researchers have decided to take matters into their own hands, using a comment feature on the widely used PubMed site. Why, after all, should readers wait to learn of updates, and, in the case of potentially serious flaws that might affect scientific conclusions, continue chasing what are likely to be dead ends that could be easily turned around with new information?advertisement Inti Ocon/AFP/Getty Images Related: Another group of researchers who noticed several errors in their 2012 article in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism did double diligence — getting the journal to correct the article, and then commenting on PubMed Commons to share a link to that correction.Those actions are important because PubMed has, over the decades, become the leading gateway for biomedical research. It’s very likely that a scientist will find an abstract on PubMed, rather than finding it somewhere else first.As we and others have argued for some time now, scientific papers are not monuments cut from stone that, once published, cannot and should not alter. In our view, readers’ and researchers’ use of social media and online forums to point out flaws in articles is a good thing. It means the system relies less on editors and journals as gatekeepers to concerns being made public. And many editors and journals don’t seem all that interested in addressing such issues, a large part of the reason that PubPeer was created.A close cousin, philosophically, is an idea dreamed up by some journal editors and other scholars to allow authors to amend their own papers. Under the proposed system, laid out earlier this month, researchers would have the opportunity to tag their articles with “amendments” about mistakes or other issues ranging from “insubstantial” to “complete” — the functional equivalent of a retraction. Indeed, the system is designed to replace the “correction” and “retraction” regime. One researcher they cite is Garret Stuber, a neurobiologist at the University of North Carolina. In February, just days after publishing a paper in Nature Neuroscience, Stuber realized that some images had been duplicated during the back-and-forth with the journal. In addition to writing to the journal, he turned to PubMed Commons to let others know about the issues, in “an effort for immediate notice and transparency to what occurred,” he told Retraction Watch. “I thought that this would be the best course of action in order to avoid any further confusion.”advertisement Why science would benefit from being self-refereed Although calling the phenomenon a trend might be a bit premature, a new article by the team behind PubMed Commons — a government-hosted forum that lets users comment on papers in the Medline database — notes with enthusiasm the recent increase in the number of researchers who have used the site to alert readers to potential problems with their work. Related: The WatchdogsScientists are getting proactive about self-corrections By Ivan Oransky and Adam Marcus April 13, 2017 Reprints The advantage of the approach, according to proponents, is that letting authors take charge of post-publication quality control will speed the whole thing up. Journals are bogged down by procedural issues, production demands, and other constraints — including lawyers, when editors are alleging fraud — that make them about as nimble as a cruise ship on an America’s Cup course.Of course, opponents might argue that these approaches leave too much in the hands of authors while undermining the expertise of journals and editors in handling such matters. We’re sympathetic — to a point. We can certainly envision a scenario in which unscrupulous authors dupe their peers by suggesting that their errors are benign. Daniele Fanelli, who called for “self-retractions” as a way to clean up the literature, anticipated that potential problem, too.So, some open questions linger. What’s not an open question, though, is that science needs to be self-correcting — and the current way that works just isn’t working anymore. Tags researchlast_img read more

Jamaica Has one of the Best Systems of Local Government in Western Hemisphere – Peart

first_imgRelatedJamaica Has one of the Best Systems of Local Government in Western Hemisphere – Peart Jamaica Has one of the Best Systems of Local Government in Western Hemisphere – Peart UncategorizedJuly 29, 2006 FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail Minister of Local Government and Environment, Dean Peart has said that Jamaica is viewed as having one of the best systems of local government in the western hemisphere, and one of the most advanced reform programmes.“Jamaica’s prominent role in advancing the local democracy agenda in the Caribbean has taken on new dimensions in the last three years, because of the high esteem and confidence accorded to its former Minister of Local Government , now Prime Minister Portia Simpson Miller,” said the Minister. He was making his contribution to the 2006/07 Sectoral Debate in the House of Representatives on July 26. Mr. Peart pointed out that as a consequence of the high regard in which the country is held, it has held a number of prominent positions regionally and internationally, with assigned obligations.“Having inherited those regional and international obligations, the Ministry will continue to play its part in supporting the advancement of local democracy in the region and meeting international mandates regarding local governance,” the Minister said.He noted that under the Parish Infrastructure Development Programme (PIDP), the local authorities have been the chief beneficiaries through a series of training, targeting Local Government personnel.The PIDP is a project within the Ministry of Local Government and Environment that is being jointly funded by the Government and the Inter- American Development Bank (IDP), and is a part of the reform process.“While the programme comes to an end in September 2006, the primary focus for the remaining months of the programme will be on the continuation of training and related follow-up activities in the Councils. This is a $26.7 million investment in Local Government,” said the Minister. RelatedJamaica Has one of the Best Systems of Local Government in Western Hemisphere – Peartcenter_img RelatedJamaica Has one of the Best Systems of Local Government in Western Hemisphere – Peart Advertisementslast_img read more

PM Orders Analysis of JPSCO

first_imgRelatedPM Orders Analysis of JPSCO Advertisements RelatedPM Orders Analysis of JPSCO PM Orders Analysis of JPSCO UncategorizedSeptember 17, 2008center_img FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail Prime Minister, Bruce Golding, has directed the Office of Utilities Regulations (OUR), to carry out a detailed analysis of the costs and charges being imposed for electricity, supplied by the Jamaica Public Service Company (JPSCo).He has also mandated the OUR, to put together a detailed analysis of the oil purchases done by Petrojam, specifically for the JPSco, covering the period January 2007 to the present.This analysis is to take into consideration the processing cost incurred by Petrojam, before channelling it to the JPSCo, in order to determine whether fuel is being provided to the utility company at the best market price.Mr. Golding gave the instructions this morning (Sept 15), during a meeting at Jamaica House, attended by the Ministers of Finance, Energy and Industry, Investment and Commerce, along with representatives of the OUR and the National Consumers League. The meeting was called in the wake of growing complaints and protests by consumers against reports of escalating electricity bills.Mr. Golding said the analysis must be done, to ensure that consumers are not being overcharged and are not being called upon to pay for inefficiency.The OUR is to complete the analysis and report to the Prime Minister within the next two weeks. RelatedPM Orders Analysis of JPSCOlast_img read more

Remarks by Vice President Harris on Verdict in Derek Chauvin Trial for Death of George Floyd

first_imgRemarks by Vice President Harris on Verdict in Derek Chauvin Trial for Death of George Floyd The White HouseCross Hall7:07 P.M. EDTTHE VICE PRESIDENT: Good evening. First, I want to thank the jury for their service, and I want to thank Mr. Floyd’s family for your steadfadnest [steadfastness].Today, we feel a sigh of relief. Still, it cannot take away the pain. A measure of justice isn’t the same as equal justice. This verdict brings us a step closer. And, the fact is, we still have work to do.We still must reform the system. Last summer, together with Senator Cory Booker and Representative Karen Bass, I introduced the George Floyd Justice in Policing Act. This bill would hold law enforcement accountable and help build trust between law enforcement and our communities. This bill is part of George Floyd’s legacy.The President and I will continue to urge the Senate to pass this legislation — not as a panacea for every problem, but as a start.This work is long overdue. America has a long history of systemic racism. Black Americans — and Black men, in particular — have been treated, throughout the course of our history, as less than human.Black men are fathers and brothers and sons and uncles and grandfathers and friends and neighbors. Their lives must be valued in our education system, in our healthcare system, in our housing system, in our economic system, in our criminal justice system, in our nation. Full stop.Because of smartphones, so many Americans have now seen the racial injustice that Black Americans have known for generations — the racial injustice that we have fought for generations; that my parents protested in the 1960s; that millions of us, Americans of every race, protested last summer.Here’s the truth about racial injustice: It is not just a Black America problem or a people of color problem. It is a problem for every American. It is keeping us from fulfilling the promise of liberty and justice for all, and it is holding our nation back from realizing our full potential.We are all a part of George Floyd’s legacy, and our job now is to honor it and to honor him.Thank you.And now, it is my great honor to introduce the President of the United States, Joe Biden.7:11 P.M. EDT /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:america, american, Bass, Criminal, criminal justice, death, education, Family, Father’s, Government, healthcare, justice, legislation, President, reform, Senate, United States, White Houselast_img read more

Supporting Community Revitalisation In Noble Park

first_imgSupporting Community Revitalisation In Noble Park VIC PremierNoble Park residents can look forward to improved streetscapes and a new local playground, thanks to the Andrews Labor Government’s $500,000 investment in the Noble Park Revitalisation Project.The work will see improvements to amenities on Douglas Street and the development of an all-abilities playground, which will allow children and people with disabilities to play in a safe new space.The Labor Government is investing $310,000 in the streetscape upgrades, and $190,000 in works for the new playground.Greater Dandenong City Council has also made contributions of $585,000 and $180,000 respectively. Works have started and will be completed in July.The development of Douglas Street and the construction of the playground will attract visitors to the Noble Park Activity Centre, supporting increased business activity. The playground will have space for nature play, sensory play and open grass areas – making it ideal for all children and adults, including those with disabilities.The improvements add to $3 million that the Government has previously invested in facilities at the Ross Reserve precinct.The projects are part of the Suburban Revitalisation Program, which supports projects across eight areas in metropolitan Melbourne – Boronia, Noble Park, Lilydale, Tarneit, Reservoir, Melton, Broadmeadows and Frankston.Funding of $21 million is being provided to the eight revitalisation boards through the Building Works stimulus program and the Victorian Budget 2020-21.The Suburban Revitalisation Program engages local councils and community groups to deliver key economic initiatives and community development projects which improve social and economic outcomes for residents.For more information, go to suburbandevelopment.vic.gov.au.As stated by Minister for Suburban Development Shaun Leane“By upgrading the streetscape and building a new playground, we’re investing in projects that will directly benefit Noble Park residents and businesses.”“Revitalisation projects right across Melbourne are improving livability, bringing communities together and boosting local economies.”As stated by Member for South Eastern Metropolitan Lee Tarlamis“Projects like the Douglas Street revitalisation project and the all-abilities playground put the needs of Noble Park people front and centre – it’s an important step in the community’s steady recovery from the effects of the pandemic.” /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:Andrews, AusPol, Australia, business, children, community, Dandenong, Eastern, Frankston, Government, Investment, local council, Melbourne, Melton, Minister, outcomes, Ross, Victorialast_img read more

CU-Boulder Hosts Japanese Speech Contest

first_img Published: March 31, 1999 College and university students from around the state will compete in a Japanese speech contest at the University of Colorado at Boulder on April 10 at 1 p.m. in the Hellems Arts and Sciences Building, room 211.The contest is expected to be a stimulating one, according to Misae Nishikura, senior instructor in the department of East Asian languages and civilizations.”After the preliminary round, 20 contestants representing four Colorado colleges and universities have been accepted to the finals,” she said. “I am impressed with the quality of the speeches and anticipate the event to be both exciting and educational.”Students from CU-Boulder, Colorado State University, the U.S. Air Force Academy and Pikes Peak Community College are scheduled to compete in the event.The contest is sponsored by EALC, the Japan Foundation and the Colorado Japanese Language Education Association. It is free and open to the public.EALC offers undergraduate, graduate and doctoral programs in Japanese. The doctoral programs are offered in conjunction with a special program in Comparative Literature. Share Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-maillast_img read more

Diversity External Review Board To Visit CU-Boulder Oct. 11 And 12

first_imgShare Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mail Published: Oct. 2, 2000 An external program review to assess diversity efforts at the University of Colorado at Boulder is scheduled for Oct. 11-12, with team members examining campus diversity plans and key strategies and progress for the four administrative divisions, schools and colleges. According to Ofelia Miramontes, associate vice chancellor for diversity and equity, the visit is important at this stage of implementing strategies because the input will help ensure campus efforts are moving in the right direction to meet the goals. “The first comprehensive campuswide report, ‘Diversity and Equity: A Blueprint for Action, First State of the Campus Diversity Report,’ has now been completed,” Miramontes said. “This report, which will be posted on the Office of Diversity Web site, provides what I believe is a good profile of the efforts across campus to meet the goals outlined in the campus Blueprint for Diversity,” Miramontes said. “We are interested in having the reviewers assess this information, talk with people across campus about issues, activities and progress, help us fine-tune efforts and suggest other strategies they feel will help us to move forward,” she said. The university will submit the campus report to each reviewer and it will be available on the Office of Diversity and Equity Web site on Thursday, Oct. 5, at http://www.Colorado.EDU/cu-diversity. After the visit, the review team will issue a report that will be used to help the university assess campus activities. The Office of Diversity and Equity plans to post the external report on its Web site when it becomes available. The five external review board members include: o Lee June, assistant provost for academic student services and multicultural issues at Michigan State University o Maria Armstrong, an Americans with Disabilities Act Officer at the University of Denver o Chocka Guiden, first-year graduate student at Portland State University and the Grass Roots Legislative Liaison for the United States Student Association o Nancy Barcelo, associate vice president for multicultural and academic affairs at the University of Minnesota o and Karen Raforth, associate vice president of student services and dean of students at Metropolitan State College, Denver For more information on the CU-Boulder Office of Diversity and Equity visit the Web site at http://www.colorado.edu/cu-diversity.last_img read more

Provost DiStefano Recommends Gleeson To Be CU-Boulder Arts & Sciences Dean

first_imgShare Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mail Published: April 15, 2002 University of Colorado at Boulder Provost Phil DiStefano has approved a search committee recommendation nominating Todd Gleeson as the new dean of the College of Arts and Sciences pending approval of the Board of Regents at the board’s May meeting. A professor of environmental, population and organismic biology, Gleeson has served as interim dean of the university’s largest college since the departure last summer of former Dean Peter Spear. Spear is now provost at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Before becoming interim dean, Gleeson was associate vice chancellor for academic affairs. “I look forward to working with Todd and the faculty of the College of Arts and Sciences,” said DiStefano. “Todd’s knowledge of the campus and the strengths of the departments will be a valuable asset as he begins his tenure as dean.” The search committee nominated Gleeson in March, following a national search, and forwarded the recommendation to DiStefano as a unanimously endorsed sole finalist. DiStefano then conducted interviews with faculty members and administrators in the arts and sciences college and throughout the university. The College of Arts and Sciences has 35 departments plus 31 programs, 723 faculty and almost 15,000 students. Gleeson, an expert in skeletal muscle and animal physiology, has been a professor in the college for 21 years.last_img read more

Noted Tanzanian Director To Visit CU-Boulder And Screen Film Jan. 29

first_imgThe Tanzanian director and producer of the first Swahili language film made for worldwide release will appear at the University of Colorado at Boulder Jan. 29 to show the film and answer questions. Professor Martin Mhando will visit CU-Boulder to screen his award-winning feature film, “Maangamizi – The Ancient One,” at the International Film Series. The 7 p.m. screening in the auditorium of the Muenzinger Psychology building is free and open to the public. Mhando is chairman of media studies at Murdoch University in Perth, western Australia, and has produced and directed a substantial body of work. As the general manager of the Tanzanian Film Co., Mhando oversaw the majority of Tanzanian productions and is well known in Tanzanian cinema as a producer and director. “Maangamizi – The Ancient One” is set in Tanzania, East Africa, with locations extending from the Indian Ocean to the heights of Mount Kilimanjaro. The film captures the essence of Tanzania’s beauty while telling a contemporary story that taps into the spiritual foundations on which many indigenous cultures were based. Kiswahili is the official language of Tanzania and Kenya and is spoken in Uganda and several East African nations. The film was the official selection at the 74th Academy Awards in the foreign language film category representing the United Republic of Tanzania. Among the film’s executive producers is Oscar-winning producer-director Jonathan Demme of “Silence of the Lambs” and “Philadelphia.” The score was composed by Grammy Award-winner Cyril Neville, the youngest of the Neville brothers. CU-Boulder has an exchange student agreement with Murdoch University. Mhando’s tour in support of his film and to promote study abroad also includes stops at Penn State University, Georgetown University and Boston College. For more information about the free screening call (303) 492-1531. Published: Jan. 21, 2003 Share Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-maillast_img read more

Science teacher retiring from SMMUSD

first_imgHomeNewsEducationScience teacher retiring from SMMUSD May. 23, 2016 at 6:20 amEducationScience teacher retiring from SMMUSDJeff Goodman5 years agocaliforniacity of santa monicaLos AngelesNewsSanta Monicasanta monica californiasanta monica news For parts of three decades, Robert Seymour figured out how to make science engaging and relevant in classrooms filled with pubescent preteens.It was perhaps the former stuntman’s greatest act.Seymour, a longtime teacher at Lincoln Middle School, confirmed this month that he’ll be retiring from the Santa Monica-Malibu school district at the end of the school year.But for Seymour, teaching middle school students about everything from genetics and ecology to bacteria and viruses was less of a stunt than a thrill.“You can still excite them about the wonder of science,” he said.Raised in Royal Oak, Michigan, Seymour studied biology and psychology at the University of Michigan while developing his skills as an acrobatic cheerleader.Seymour started dental school at Michigan but steered himself in a different direction after two years, going to Orlando to work as a stuntman at the former Disney MGM Studios (now Disney’s Hollywood Studios).Seymour eventually relocated to Southern California to pursue acting and began taking classes at UCLA to earn a master’s degree in education. With his science background, he said, teaching “was a perfect fit.”Seymour first landed in SMMUSD as a student teacher at Santa Monica High School and was hired to work at Lincoln Middle School in 1992.In 1996, Seymour obtained a second master’s degree in administrative services and later served one year as an assistant principal at Lincoln.In 2005-06, Seymour achieved National Board Certification in early adolescent science, a highly regarded credential in the teaching profession and perhaps the biggest highlight of his teaching career. The distinction is earned through a rigorous, performance-based assessment. As of last year, SMMUSD had more than 70 teachers with the prestigious certification.Seymour’s tenure at Lincoln was broken up by a one-year stint in Albuquerque, where he taught middle school science in 2007-08. But, he said, he missed the people and environment in SMMUSD.“There’s nothing like Santa Monica,” he said. “It’s an awesome district, and Lincoln is an amazing place.”Seymour said the camaraderie among the staff at Lincoln made his job enjoyable and inspired him to prepare for his classes each day.He added that he will miss “working tirelessly to make learning come alive for our kiddos and being able to have some fun doing our yearly Faculty Follies.” He served many years as director of the follies, a popular series of stage performances featuring members of Lincoln’s staff.Seymour said it was a satisfying challenge to figure out how to maximize each student’s potential and come up with ways to make the academic material accessible through a variety of methods.“Each one is like a puzzle,” he said.Seymour said his only regret is not embarking on his teaching career sooner. He didn’t start until he was 32.In retirement, Seymour plans to move back to New Mexico and take up another to-be-determined job.“I’m sure something will come my way,” he said. “I am not good at just sitting still.”[email protected] :californiacity of santa monicaLos AngelesNewsSanta Monicasanta monica californiasanta monica newsshare on Facebookshare on Twitteradd a commentStraight out of rehabParking fees in place at parks near Expo LineYou Might Also LikeBriefsNewsBeach House Begins Community Re-Opening June 15Guest Author2 days agoBriefsNewsInput Invited for Marine Park Improvement ProjectsGuest Author2 days agoBriefsNewsPublic Health Emphasizes the Importance of Vaccinations as Distancing and Masking Guidelines Relax Next WeekGuest Author2 days agoBriefsNews“Righting Our Wrongs” performance on June 11Guest Author2 days agoBriefsNewsSEATTLE Feds plan to curtail West Coast salmon fishing to help orcasGuest Author2 days agoColumnsFeaturedNewsOpinionWhat’s the Point?whats the pointGAY PRIDE MONTH IS HERE FOR ALL OF USDavid Pisarra2 days agolast_img read more