Anti-TNF therapies could treat patients with COVID-19-related acute respiratory distress: GlobalData

first_img Read Article By EH News Bureau on June 8, 2020 Menopause to become the next game-changer in global femtech solutions industry by 2025 Related Posts Anti-TNF therapies could treat patients with COVID-19-related acute respiratory distress: GlobalData Comments (0) Add Comment #Covid19Anti-TNF therapyGlobalData The missing informal workers in India’s vaccine story Although anti-TNF therapy could be useful clinically, it is possible that it may not outweigh the cost-benefit ratioRemicade (infliximab) and Humira (adalimumab) are the established anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF) therapies that have been shown to decrease inflammation in diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). As these anti-TNF therapies reduce inflammation, they could treat COVID-19 patients with acute respiratory distress (ARDS), says GlobalData, a data and analytics company.This would reduce COVID-19 mortality, as about 17 per cent of COVID-19 patients develop ARDS.Patrick Aiyes, Senior Healthcare Analyst, GlobalData, comments, “Currently, there are no pharmaceutical companies testing TNF inhibitors in patients with COVID-19; this could be an opportunity to explore, given the pressing need for treatments for COVID-19. The proposed patient group for anti-TNF therapy would be those in a clinical trial setting with moderate diseases and requiring oxygen support but not admitted to intensive care.”Although anti-TNF therapy could be useful clinically, it is possible that it may not outweigh the cost-benefit ratio, given that in diseases such as ulcerative colitis (UC), the annual cost of therapy can range from $11,000–14,000 in the UK.”Aiyes concludes, “Although in theory, anti-TNF therapy could be beneficial in treating COVID-19, concerns surrounding the drug class’ safety profile remain. In COVID-19 patients, there is some evidence that bacterial infections could develop faster in a damaged lung and anti-TNF therapy could increase the risk of that infection due to its effects on a patient’s inflammatory response. There are preclinical studies in mice that demonstrate that anti-TNF therapy improves symptoms of influenza and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). In RA patients, blocking TNF reduces cytokine concentrations. This indicates that anti-TNFs in COVID-19 patients could prove beneficial.” Heartfulness group of organisations launches ‘Healthcare by Heartfulness’ COVID care app Share Phoenix Business Consulting invests in telehealth platform Healpha Indraprastha Apollo Hospitals releases first “Comprehensive Textbook of COVID-19” MaxiVision Eye Hospitals launches “Mucormycosis Early Detection Centre” News WHO tri-regional policy dialogue seeks solutions to challenges facing international mobility of health professionalslast_img read more