Showing 50 Result(s)

Intel(R) Hybrid Cloud Introduction Webinar – July 1st, 10-11PM PDT

first_imgIf your interested in AMT for servers, here’s the 1st webinar where I’ll be talking about this new platform.  Please join us.Intel® Hybrid Cloud Pilot ProgramOffer your small business customers cloud-like flexibility, with the peace of mind offered by on-premise hardware. Intel® Hybrid Cloud is an innovative new subscription-based model for providing locally hosted server software on a pay-as-you-go basis. Small businesses get all of the benefits of services in the cloud, with the responsiveness and consistency of local applications, plus the peace of mind of having your data on site. Whether you are already selling managed services or are thinking about expanding into this rapidly growing market, Intel Hybrid Cloud can be a valuable addition to your portfolio.If you are interested to hear more about this new Pilot Program and Platform register for the webinar.Chris Graham and I will be providing a technology and business overview of the pilot.   Please join in and you can also follow me on twitter @JoshProstar to hear more about what we are planning.  Date:  July 1st (Thursday)Time: 10-11AM PDTlast_img read more

Elsevier to Editor: Change Controversial Journal or Resign

first_imgThe editor of the journal Medical Hypotheses—an oddity in the world of scientific publishing because it does not practice peer review—is about to lose his job over the publication last summer of a paper that says HIV does not cause AIDS. Publishing powerhouse Elsevier today told editor Bruce Charlton that it won’t renew his contract, which expires at the end of 2010, and it asked that Charlton resign immediately or implement a series of changes in his editorial policy, including putting a system of peer review in place. Charlton, who teaches evolutionary psychology at the University of Newcastle upon Tyne in the United Kingdom, says he will do neither, and some on the editorial advisory board say they may resign in protest if he is fired.Elsevier’s move is the latest in an 8-month battle over the journal; it comes after an anonymous panel convened by Elsevier recommended drastic changes to the journal’s course, and five scientists reviewed the controversial paper and unanimously panned it.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Medical Hypotheses, which says it “will consider radical, speculative and non-mainstream scientific ideas provided they are coherently expressed,” is the only Elsevier journal not to practice peer review. Scientist, entrepreneur, and author David Horrobin, who founded the journal in 1975, believed reviewers tend to dislike what lies outside the scientific mainstream and thus are reluctant to embrace new ideas, however promising. Charlton, who succeeded Horrobin in 2003, takes the same view: He decides what gets published himself—although he occasionally will consult another scientist—and manuscripts are edited only very lightly. As thejournal’s Web site explains, “the editor sees his role as a ‘chooser’, not a ‘changer.’ “=”#description”>It’s a policy that leads to the occasional wild and wacky paper—a 2009 article for which the author studied his own navel lint became an instant classic—but the journal is also a “unique and excellent” venue for airing new and valuable ideas, says neuroscientist Vilayanur Ramachandran of the University of California (UC), San Diego, who published in the journal 15 times himself and sits on its editorial advisory board. “There are ideas that may seem implausible but which are very important if true,” Ramachandran says. “This is the only place you can get them published.”But the journal got in hot water in July when Charlton “chose” a paper, previously rejected by the Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes, in which molecular virologist Peter Duesberg of UC Berkeley and colleagues assert that HIV does not cause AIDS and that medical statistics and demographical data do not support the existence of a massive AIDS epidemic in South Africa. Duesberg, a so-called “AIDS denialist,” has disputed the link between HIV and AIDS since the 1980s; his paper was an attack on a study by Harvard University scientists claiming that more then 300,000 lives were lost because the South African government dragged its feet in the introduction of anti-HIV therapy.Charlton says he is “agnostic” on the question whether HIV causes AIDS but adds that even papers that are wrong can make interesting points—and that can make the reader rethink his or her own viewpoint. “If he believes that, he should have a great big health warning on every page saying, ‘This may be rubbish,’ ” says Nicoli Nattrass, an economist at the University of Cape Town and the author of another study on the price of AIDS denialism in her country. Nattrass and others say publication in a scientific journal gives Duesberg’s paper an undeserved air of respectability and credibility that can harm public health. “This is not just some stupid academic debate,” she says. “Many people in South Africa still don’t believe HIV causes AIDS because there are scientists who say so. And they are dying because of it.”After the paper’s publication, prominent HIV scientists John Moore of Weill Cornell Medical College in New York City and Nobelist Françoise Barré-Sinoussi of the Pasteur Institute in Paris wrote Elsevier to ask that the paper be withdrawn. Others asked the National Library of Medicine to delist Medical Hypotheses from MEDLINE, the world’s foremost database of biomedical literature, and called on scientists to urge their librarians to cancel the journal. (They also took aim at a second AIDS paper by molecular biologist Marco Ruggiero of the University of Florence, which they say had denialist tendencies as well.)Following the advice of an external panel whose membership has not been made public, Elsevier wrote Charlton on 22 January to say that Medical Hypotheses would have to become a peer-reviewed journal. Potentially controversial papers should receive especially careful scrutiny, the publisher said, and some topics—including “hypotheses that could be interpreted as supporting racism” should be off limits.Elsevier also had its flagship medical journal, The Lancet, organize a formal review by five anonymous experts. The reviews, which have not yet been released publicly but were obtained by Science, were unanimously harsh—especially about the Duesberg paper, indicating that it is riddled with errors and misinterpretations. “It might entertain their friends and relatives on a cold winter evening, but it does not belong in a scientific journal,” one reviewer wrote. On 24 February, Elsevier wrote Duesberg that his paper—which had not yet been printed and had been taken down from the journal’s Web site in August—would be “permanently withdrawn.” Ruggiero received a similar letter 5 days later.Charlton disputes the validity and objectivity of the review—which he calls a “show trial”—and says the publisher had no right to override his editorial decision. He says he has received letters from more than 150 Medical Hypotheses authors who support him, a selection of which he has published on his Weblog.A majority of the journal’s Editorial Advisory Board is behind Charlton as well. On 12 February, 13 of the Board’s 19 members wrote Elsevier to demand that the papers be returned to the journal’s Web site and to reject the proposed changes to its editorial policies. Not having peer review “is an integral part of our identity, indeed our very raison d’être,” the group wrote. That does not mean they’re all happy with the paper, says board member David Healy, a professor in psychological medicine at Cardiff University School of Medicine in the United Kingdom. “It’s a defense of Bruce, not of the Duesberg paper,” he says.At least one of those on the board strongly disagrees with the majority, however. Antonio Damasio, head of the University of Southern California’s Brain and Creativity Institute in Los Angeles, says that the paper should never have been published but acknowledges that he has not kept up with the affair. Duesberg—who has not published anything on HIV the past decade except for one paper in a journal published by the Indian Academy of Sciences—says Elsevier’s measures are the latest example of “censorship” imposed by the “AIDS establishment.” But Medical Hypotheses’ critics applaud the publisher’s latest step. “It seems clear that Elsevier has come to realize that there is a problem with Medical Hypotheses and that they are doing what they can to rectify it,” says Moore.last_img read more

Senate Panel Proposes Smaller Cuts to Science Agencies Than House

first_imgSenate Democrats unveiled a plan today to trim federal spending for the rest of the fiscal year that takes smaller bites out of the Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Office of Science, the National Science Foundation (NSF), and NASA than what the House of Representatives has proposed. But it suggests that cuts in research are all but inevitable this year.The Senate bill, which could be brought to the floor as early as Tuesday, proposes a reduction over current spending of almost $11 billion, compared with the $61 billion reduction in the House version passed last month. To make it look larger—and thus more appealing to fiscal hawks—Senate leaders described it as a $51 billion reduction from the president’s 2011 request, submitted 13 months ago and never enacted by Congress.Details of the Senate proposal are still somewhat sketchy, however.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)The Senate Appropriations committee says that NSF would receive $6.87 billion under its plan rather than the $6.57 billion in the House version. That’s a reduction of roughly $50 million below the current level of $6.92 billion. NASA would receive $18.5 billion rather than its current level of $18.7 billion. The House version would lower it to $18.4 billion.Under the Senate version, DOE’s Office of Science and the new Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E) would be trimmed by a total of $523 million. By comparison, the Senate panel says the House version would nearly double the size of that cut, slashing $1.04 billion. But it’s hard to know for sure because of the complications in calculating the budget of each program. The Office of Science now receives $4.9 billion and would get $4 billion in the House version. ARPA-E, which doesn’t have a regular appropriation, sought $300 million in 2011.The statement released today does not mention the National Institutes of Health, which under the House bill would be held to its 2010 levels. The president had requested a $1 billion increase in 2011.The government is currently being funded under a continuing resolution (CR) that expires on 18 March. If the Senate and House don’t reach an agreement by then, another CR will be needed to avoid a shutdown.See our 2012 Budget coverage.last_img read more

Did ancient Mesopotamians get high? Near Eastern rituals may have included opium, cannabis

first_img ROBERT S. MERRILLEES Cypriot jugs were crafted in the shape of the poppy seed pod 3000 years ago. Poppies, shown here with seed pods, have been used to produce opium in the Near East for some 5000 years. By Andrew LawlerApr. 19, 2018 , 2:00 PM Once people organized into city states, they may also have started large-scale production of pharmaceuticals, says archaeologist Luca Peyronel of the International University of Languages and Media in Milan, Italy. A decade ago, before the onset of Syria’s brutal civil war, he was part of a team that gathered samples from an unusual kitchen in a palace in the northwestern Syrian city of Ebla, which flourished 4 millennia ago on the outskirts of the Sumerian and Akkadian empires.The room lacked the plant and animal remains typically associated with food preparation. But residue analyses on pots found there may explain the mystery, as Peyronel and his colleagues described in a paper last year: The researchers found traces of wild plants often used for medicine, such as poppy for opium to dull pain, heliotrope to fight viral infections, and chamomile to reduce inflammation. Given that the space contained eight hearths and pots that could hold 40 to 70 liters, the drugs could have been made in large quantities, Peyronel says.Some of these extracts, such as opium, can induce hallucinations, although it’s unclear whether the potions were used in ritual or medicine. The kitchen’s location near the heart of the palace suggests its products were used for ceremonial occasions, and cuneiform tablets from the building mention special priests associated with ritual beverages, Peyronel says. The distinction between medicine and mind-altering drug may have been lost on ancient peoples. “The two hypotheses are not necessarily at odds,” he adds.Three hundred kilometers due west and several centuries later, the ancient people of Cyprus used opium in religious ceremonies, Collard says. Residue analyses show that between 1600 and 1000 B.C.E., people poured opium alkaloids into pots crafted in the shape of the seed capsule of the opium poppy, in what Collard calls “prehistoric commodity branding.” All the jugs were found in temples and tombs, suggesting a role in ritual. Opium jugs made on Cyprus have been found in Egypt and the Levant—the first clear example of the international drug trade.Other substances less well known today may have played a role in healing or ecstatic rituals in the ancient Near East. When King Tutankhamun’s tomb, dating to the 14th century B.C.E., was opened in 1922, archaeologists found the boy-king’s body covered with the flowers of blue water lily, a common motif in many Egyptian tomb paintings. Steeped in wine for several weeks, the plant yields a sedative that produces a calm euphoria.Diana Stein, an archaeologist at Birkbeck University of London, claims archaeologists have long studied scenes of rituals involving drugs and their effects without realizing it. She argues that the banquet scenes that often adorn small seals found Anatolia, Syria, Mesopotamia, and Iran actually show people imbibing psychoactive potions. Another common motif, interpreted as a scene of contest, may instead represent the internal conflict that results when the imbiber faces an alternative reality, Stein proposes. In these images, “everything is distorted and pulsing—but they certainly knew how to carve things realistically when they wanted to,” she said at the meeting here.“I find Diana’s arguments convincing and even energizing, as they open up a new avenue for research,” says Megan Cifarelli, an art historian at Manhattanville College in Purchase, New York.But others are more cautious. “Scholars have tended to shy away from the possibility that the ancient Near Easterners partook of ‘recreational’ drugs, apart from alcohol, so it’s good that someone is brave enough to look into it,” says archaeologist Glenn Schwartz at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland. But he says Stein’s suggestions “seem to go too far on too little evidence,” a view echoed by many at the meeting.Collard, however, is confident that additional residue and botanical analyses, along with study of iconography and texts, will gradually persuade skeptics. Cifarelli notes that the ancients likely used drugs not just to heal, but to forge sets of beliefs, and contact a spiritual realm where healing and religion were entwined. “Most of us,” she says, “are so far removed from that kind of transformative magic.”*Correction, 23 April, 1:20 p.m.: This story has been corrected to note that alcohol was fermented, rather than distilled, at least 10,000 years ago; distillation was developed later.center_img ISTOCK.COM/OZTURK Did ancient Mesopotamians get high? Near Eastern rituals may have included opium, cannabis MUNICH, GERMANY—For as long as there has been civilization, there have been mind-altering drugs. Alcohol was fermented at least 10,000 years ago in the Fertile Crescent, about the same time that agriculture took hold there. Elsewhere, for example in Mesoamerica, other psychoactive drugs were an important part of culture. But the ancient Near East had seemed curiously drug-free—until recently.Now, new techniques for analyzing residues in excavated jars and identifying tiny amounts of plant material suggest that ancient Near Easterners indulged in a range of psychoactive substances. Recent advances in identifying traces of organic fats, waxes, and resins invisible to the eye have allowed scientists to pinpoint the presence of various substances with a degree of accuracy unthinkable a decade or two ago.For example, “hard scientific evidence” shows that ancient people extracted opium from poppies, says David Collard, senior archaeologist at Jacobs, an engineering firm in Melbourne, Australia, who found signs of ritual opium use on Cyprus dating back more than 3000 years. By then, drugs like cannabis had arrived in Mesopotamia, while people from Turkey to Egypt experimented with local substances such as blue water lily.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Some senior researchers are still dubious, pointing out that ancient texts are mostly silent on such substances. Others consider the topic “unworthy of scholarly attention,” Collard says. “The archaeology of the ancient Near East is traditionally conservative.”But the work is prompting fresh thinking on the relationship between substances and societies. At the International Congress on the Archaeology of the Ancient Near East here last week, for example, one scholar even reinterpreted well-studied ancient images as representing drug-taking rituals and drug-induced distortions.Drug use almost certainly began in prehistory and spread with migrations. For example, the Yamnaya people, who swept out of Central Asia about 5000 years ago and left their genes in most living Europeans and South Asians, appear to have carried cannabis to Europe and the Middle East. In 2016, a team from the German Archaeological Institute and the Free University, both in Berlin, found residues and botanical remains of the plant, which originates in East and Central Asia, at Yamnaya sites across Eurasia. It’s difficult to know whether the Yamnaya used cannabis simply to make hemp for rope or also smoked or ingested it. But some ancient people did inhale: Digs in the Caucasus have uncovered braziers containing seeds and charred remains of cannabis dating to about 3000 B.C.E.last_img read more

Solskjaer hints at January arrivals at Man Utd

first_imgOle Gunnar Solskjaer has hinted that Manchester United will be making moves in the January window and has vowed he will “have an input” over the club’s transfer dealings.The former Red Devils striker has taken interim charge of the Old Trafford outfit until the end of the season having replaced the sacked Jose Mourinho.Solskjaer has been tasked with turning around the fortunes of this United side after a disappointing start to the campaign. Editors’ Picks Man Utd ready to spend big on Sancho and Haaland in January Who is Marcus Thuram? Lilian’s son who is top of the Bundesliga with Borussia Monchengladbach Brazil, beware! Messi and Argentina out for revenge after Copa controversy Best player in MLS? Zlatan wasn’t even the best player in LA! Part of that process may involve the arrival of new faces during the winter window, and former Norway international Solskjaer is not ruling out a busy month of spending in the new year.He told reporters at his first press conference on Friday: “I will have an input of course but the job now is to get to know the players, observe them and see the qualities they possess.“I have seen more or less every game from Norway when I’ve had time. I have to get to know the players, and see what I can help them improve on.“The club has their recruitment and scouting so I’m sure they’ve got their targets.”Poor recruitment has played a key role in United’s struggles since Sir Alex Ferguson’s retirement, with a number of big-money signings struggling to make the desired impact on the first-team.Angel Di Maria, Paul Pogba and Alexis Sanchez are just some of the world stars who have failed to live up to the hype surrounding them over the last five years, while this summer’s £52 million ($66m) arrival, Fred, has found himself out of the starting XI for much of the campaign.Fred Manchester United 2018-19Whomever arrives in January, Solskjaer will be hopeful they can aid his new side in their battle to finish as high up the Premier League table as possible.After 17 games the 20-time English champions sit sixth in the table, 19 points behind leaders Liverpool and 11 points behind fourth-placed Chelsea in the race for a Champions League spot.Solskjaer’s tenure begins on Saturday against Cardiff City – a team he managed during the 2013-14 campaign though he could not save them from relegation to the Championship.And he admits he learned a lot from his time in South Wales, saying: “I’m getting old, my grey hairs are coming, I’ve had about 300-400 games as a first-team manager now. That period in Cardiff was of course a huge step for me.”I’ve learnt a lot, I’ve evaluated, I’ve reflected on it. I made a few mistakes, but if you don’t make mistakes you’re not going to learn and unfortunately I made a few of them.”But then again they’re in the Premier League now so I don’t think they’re too unhappy about it now.”Solskjaer will be without striker Romelu Lukaku for the match at the Cardiff City Stadium as the Red Devils look for just their third win in nine games in all competitions.last_img read more

Farming Couple Competes for 100000 Award

first_imgA Colchester County farming couple is hoping to convince Canadians of their entrepreneurial zeal in a competition to help fund their dream. Tim and Kimberly Stokdijk, are among nine finalists competing for $100,000 in the Business Development Corporation’s Young Entrepreneur Award contest. The winner will be chosen by an online vote, that closes June 11. “Stokdijik Greenhouses is a great example of innovation in Nova Scotia agriculture,” said Agriculture Minister John MacDonell. “I congratulate the Stokdijiks and encourage Nova Scotians to show their support by voting for them.” The Stokdijiks’s grow vegetables in Beaver Brook, Colchester Co. If they win, the couple will use the prize money to introduce a line of high-quality gourmet spreads and condiments made from their produce. The expansion will help ensure the long-term viability of their third-generation business. “We are privileged, as Nova Scotia farmers, to have been selected as finalists in the BDC contest,” said Kimberly Stokdijk. “This is a great opportunity for us to showcase what our industry does best, which is to innovate. If we are successful, we will be able to do more of what we love, which is to feed people in Nova Scotia and beyond some of the best products available.” The Stokdijiks plan to test their creations locally before introducing them to retail grocery, specialty and online markets across Canada and possibly internationally. To vote for the Stokdijks, or to view their video profile online, visit www.bdc.ca/yea.last_img read more

Malaysian bicycle racing teams stolen wheels recovered by Alberta RCMP

first_imgNISKU, Alta. – The RCMP has recovered nine of 10 expensive bicycles that were stolen earlier this summer from a teenage Malaysian cycling team training in Edmonton.The bikes — believed to be worth more than $40,000 — were taken from a storage locker at the Argyll Velodrome during a break-in on July 18.It’s believed the thief or thieves specifically targeted the locker, which contained eight specialized track bikes and two road bikes.The team had been in Edmonton for about a month when the theft occurred.Mounties say they received information that led them to an abandoned property near Nisku, just south of the city, where the bikes were discovered last Thursday.The bicycles appeared to be undamaged and will be given back to the racing team once the police investigation is completed.“We understand the loss that the racing team felt and we’re very pleased to be able to return these special bikes,” RCMP spokesman Cpl. William Hiscock said in a statement.No charges have been laid. (The Canadian Press, CTV Edmonton)last_img read more

Attack ads on simmer Manitoba election campaign more about issues than scandal

first_imgWINNIPEG — With one party leader getting into trouble over his tropical vacation home and another with past criminal convictions and misogynistic writings, there’s a lot of material for a negative Manitoba election campaign.But halfway through the four-week campaign, party advertising has not been overly negative.“They might be saving it,” says Royce Koop, head of political studies at the University of Manitoba.Long before Progressive Conservative Leader Brian Pallister called the election for Sept. 10, the Opposition New Democrats consistently attacked Pallister over his vacation villa in Costa Rica, where he at one point planned to spend up to two months a year. Pallister also failed to pay a Costa Rica tax on luxury properties until recently because he had not kept his property assessment up to date.Following regular attacks in the legislature, the New Democrats held a fundraising raffle. The winner got a Costa Rica vacation.On the campaign trail, however, the New Democrats have been tightly focused on public services, especially Pallister’s ongoing reforms to health care that have seen some hospital emergency departments downgraded.Their one, very marked exception is two recent ads in which actors appear to call Pallister an “ass,” although the last two letters are drowned out by traffic noise.“We don’t want to make it personal about Brian Pallister. We want to make it about what he’s done,” says Bob Dewar, the NDP’s campaign director who also ran the party’s efforts in 1999 and 2003 under Gary Doer. Most recently, he directed John Horgan’s win in British Columbia.People on doorsteps already know about Pallister’s Costa Rica issues, Dewar said. The messaging now is about front-line programs.“When (people) sit around their kitchen tables and their living rooms and talk to each other, they’re talking about things that matter in their lives. And health care is one of them and we want to make sure we’re talking about that.”Pallister’s Tories have been running some negative ads on Kinew, mainly about a domestic assault charge against him that was stayed by the Crown and an assault conviction for which he has received a record suspension.But the advertising has been small-scale for a party with over $1 million in the bank — five times what the New Democrats have, according to the latest financial filings with Elections Manitoba.The Tories have run professionally produced, positive ads focusing on Pallister’s personal history — his rise from poverty and entry into politics. Most of the attacks on Kinew have been low-budget web videos or graphics on a website.The Tories’ campaign director, David McLaughlin, hinted that advertising efforts from all parties may be on simmer until later in the campaign, especially with people on summer holidays.“In terms of advertising resources and campaign marketing resources, there’s clearly, in election campaigns, more propensity to decide in the latter half of the campaign,” McLaughlin said.“In the context of Mr. Kinew, we haven’t been silent on it. It’s been out there, but we’ll see what’s required, as people pay attention and start to ask some questions.”Kinew has a lot of potential target material, some of which he was up front about in his 2015 memoir. He was convicted of impaired driving and assaulting a taxi driver — matters for which he has since received record suspensions.But Kinew’s book did not include some disturbing facts contained in the court record about the latter conviction — the incident started with Kinew uttering racial epithets at the driver. The book also did not reveal an accusation from a former girlfriend of domestic assault, which was stayed by the Crown several months after she went to police and the charge was laid.There were also misogynistic and homophobic rap lyrics and social media posts Kinew made, including a lyric in which he bragged about slapping women’s genitalia and a Twitter post in which he asked if he could catch avian flu from “kissing fat chicks.”There can be a risk for the Tories in going too negative and facing a potential backlash from voters, Koop said.But the party may be also be feeling comfortable with their current public support. Polls this year have consistently suggested the Progressive Conservatives have a substantial lead on the NDP, although the race is tight in vote-rich Winnipeg.“It might be that the Tories feel from their polling that they don’t really need to use (negative advertising) as intensely as they thought they did,” Koop said.“And the NDP might be finding that it doesn’t really help them that much to go after Pallister.”Steve Lambert, The Canadian Presslast_img read more

Airbnb says it hasnt reversed West Bank policy

first_imgJERUSALEM — Airbnb says it hasn’t reversed its plan to stop listing properties in Israeli settlements in the occupied West Bank.Earlier Monday, Israel’s tourism minister, Yariv Levin, said Airbnb pledged “not to implement” its decision during a meeting between the two sides. Airbnb’s plan would affect around 200 properties.But Airbnb says that report was inaccurate. The San Francisco-based company says it is developing the tools needed to implement its policy while it continues to talk with stakeholders.The company announced last month that it would stop listing properties in the settlements, which are considered illegal by most of the world.The decision prompted uproar in Israel. Officials accused the company of anti-Semitism and threatened to impose taxes on its operations in Israel. Lawsuits were filed in Israel and the U.S._____Isabel DeBre in Jerusalem contributed to this report.The Associated Presslast_img read more

CJ asks court to quash impeachment guilty verdict

Bandaranayake was found guilty of not disclosing details of 20 bank accounts, buying a house for another person as an attorney and then taking judicial control of cases against the company that sold the property. She was also found to have a conflict of interest because she has supervisory powers over judges hearing a corruption case against her husband, who is a former state bank chairman.Bandaranayake has denied the charges against her. In relation to the case against her husband, Bandaranayake said the claim of a conflict of interest was based not on facts but on probabilities.Rajapaksa appointed Bandaranayake as the country’s first female chief justice last year, but she began to be heavily criticized by the government after she ordered that a proposed law giving vast powers to the economic development minister was illegal. The minister is President Rajapaksa’s brother. (AP) Bandaranayake’s lawyers said in their application that she was not given enough time to prepare for her defense, and was not given lists of witnesses or an opportunity for her lawyers to cross-examine them. Her request for a public hearing, or for observers to view the proceedings, was turned down, and she was insulted personally, the lawyers said.Bandaranayake, her lawyers and four opposition lawmakers who were members of the committee walked out midway during a hearing, saying they did not believe in its fairness. Seven ruling party lawmakers met in their absence to deliver the verdict, which Bandaranayake told the court was illegal. The parliamentary committee this month found Bandaranayake guilty of three charges and declared her unfit for office. Parliament will vote on the report when it reconvenes early next year. The result goes to President Mahinda Rajapaksa, who can dismiss or retain Bandaranayake. The impeachment is seen as the culmination of a months-long dispute between the judiciary and the Parliament, which Rajapaksa controls. With more than two-thirds of the 225-member Parliament on Rajapaksa’s side, the vote against the chief justice is expected to be carried easily. The chief justice today asked an appeals court to quash a parliamentary committee report that found her guilty of unexplained wealth and misuse of power. She says the verdict was illegal, she was not given a fair hearing and the committee itself was unconstitutional.Lawyers for Chief Justice Shirani Bandaranayake also asked the court to bar the parliament speaker from announcing a debate and a vote on the report. read more

Enbridge Energy Transfer outline plan for shipping more crude to Gulf Coast

AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email CALGARY – Enbridge Inc. and a partner are planning to spend up to US$3.4 billion to reconfigure a natural gas pipeline to carry oil to the eastern Gulf Coast, a market that currently relies on rail and barge for crude shipments.Enbridge (TSX:ENB) and Dallas-based Energy Transfer Partners would each own 50 per cent of the project, which would stretch more than 1,100 kilometres from an oil hub at Patoka, Ill., to the St. James hub in Louisiana.Each company would invest between $1.2 billion and $1.7 billion in the project and Energy Transfer would operate it.The line is expected to be in service by 2015, likely carrying between 420,000 and 660,000 barrels per day of crude.The proposal, which requires U.S. regulatory approvals to go ahead, is one of many to help move more crude from Alberta’s oilsands and the Bakken, an oil-rich rock formation centred in North Dakota, to the U.S. Gulf Coast.Canadian crude has recently been sold at a bigger discount than usual because of a lack of pipeline capacity out of western Canada and the U.S Midwest. Burgeoning Bakken volumes, unlocked by drilling advances, have compounded the problem.There is a “tremendous” demand for Bakken crude in the Louisiana market, with some 400,000 barrels per day moving there mainly by rail, said Steve Wuori, the Enbridge executive in charge of oil pipelines.Smaller heavy volumes move there by barge along the Mississippi River.Wuori says he sees the St. James market taking both types of crude.Refineries in the western Gulf Coast — Texas — are mainly configured to handle heavier oil, and a number of initiatives are underway to bring oilsands crude there.Enbridge CEO Al Monaco said that market is “screaming” for more heavy oil to supplant dropping volumes from Venezuela and Mexico. Enbridge and Houston-based Enterprise Products Partners have reversed the Seaway pipeline between Oklahoma and Texas and expect a major expansion to be in service next year.Between initiatives to tap the eastern and western Gulf markets, Wuori said he sees tankers of crude from Venezuela, Saudi Arabia and elsewhere having to look for other customers.“Inevitably with greater, greater and greater American and Canadian supply, that’s going to back out those imports,” he said.And that should help narrow the price gap between American and global crude benchmarks, Wuori added.“Differentials are funny things, but the market is very efficient at removing large arbitrages and I think that’s what you’re going to see happen as we move those volumes there.”On a conference call to discuss Enbridge’s fourth-quarter results, one analyst asked if today’s pipeline pinch could be reversed into a pipeline glut within the next few years, as a litany of Gulf Coast-bound projects come on stream.“We are definitely tight right now and I would say that by 2015-16 when we finish our initiatives and some others get done by others, I think that we’ll probably be in balance by that time,” Monaco replied.Wuori added that Enbridge intends to take a “surgical approach” to deciding where to build pipe.The eastern Gulf project, he said, “is really designed to take what is currently a rail and water market and make it a pipe market. There’s very little crude that can move by pipe into that market. It ought to be a pipeline market. It will be a pipeline market just like the western Gulf Coast.”On the other hand, it wouldn’t make sense to build pipe to the Philadelphia market, since it’s better suited to take crude shipments by tanker and rail.The key, Wuori said, is to give customers “optionality.”“Who knows where all the various crudes are going to need to go? Who knows what differentials are going to do?”The latest proposal would redeploy a variety of existing pipelines, including part of Energy Transfer’s Trunkline natural gas system, as well as Enbridge’s new Southern Access Extension, which is under development.The safety and environmental impact of oil pipelines has come under increased scrutiny in recent years, particularly after a major spill from an Enbridge pipeline into Michigan’s Kalamazoo River in 2010.Environmentalists, local politicians, landowners and First Nations communities have raised objections to several major projects, including Enbridge’s Northern Gateway and TransCanada’s Keystone XL.Keystone XL would carry crude and oilsands bitumen from Canada and the northern United States to southern refineries while Enbridge’s Northern Gateway would link Alberta producers to export terminals on the B.C. coast.Also on Friday, Enbridge reported fourth-quarter net earnings of $146 million, or 18 cents per diluted share, down from $159 million, or 21 cents per share a year earlier.Adjusted for one-time items, earnings were $327 million, or 42 cents per share, compared to $273 million, or 36 cents per share.Revenues were $7.2 billion, a drop from $7.3 billion.Enbridge shares rose 38 cents to $44.51 in afternoon trading on the Toronto Stock Exchange.Note to readers: This is a corrected story. An earlier story said Energy Transfer Partners is based in Houston Enbridge, Energy Transfer outline plan for shipping more crude to Gulf Coast by Lauren Krugel, The Canadian Press Posted Feb 15, 2013 2:32 pm MDT read more

Death Cab For Cutie Streaming OneTake Video Shoot Live on Web

first_imgSure Ben Gibbard has done his time in the Postal Service, but the singer wants the world to know that he’s also down with the latest technologies. For his latest trick, Gibbard’s band Death Cab for Cutie will be shooting a one-take video to promote its new single “You Are a Tourist”–a single take that will be live streamed on the Web. Gibbard told MTV, It’s kind of hard to describe because it’s kind of like … I liken it to a five-year-old trying to explain their trip to Disneyland. It’s sensory overload, so there’s a lot of things happening, and trying to kind of walk anybody through it would be very difficult. But there are lights and dancers, and smoke and projections, and it’s gonna be kind of a little bit of a Busby Berkeley-type of spectacle. The shoot will reportedly involve complex choreography and a slew of actors and dancers. There will also be some serious live electronic effects involved, including projections of cityscapes and designs in sync with the music.The band is currently practicing the video, which will be shot tonight at 7PM ET. You can watch a stream over at YouAreATourist.com.last_img read more

Heres What Happened Today Sunday

first_img Share Tweet Email Get our daily news round up: Here’s What Happened Today: Sunday A glimpse of Trump’s North Korea strategy and Bertie Ahern on a Fianna Fáil-Sinn Féin coalition – it’s the Evening Fix. Leo Varadkar would be a more popular choice as Taoiseach than Simon Coveney, according to a new opinion pollSinn Féin deputy leader Mary Lou McDonald said that she thinks the Sisters of Charity should “gift” the maternity hospital site to the StateGardaí arrested a man in connection with the investigation of Samantha Walsh‘s murderBertie Ahern indulged in some speculation on whether Fianna Fáil should go into coalition with Sinn Féin or Fine GaelThe body of a 22-year-old woman was found in a vacant building in Cork cityA Grace case whistleblower requested to appear before committee to make any subsequent questioning of the HSE “more productive”Modelling agencies warned the public that people are pretending to be modelling agents online, and then ask people to send them revealing pictures. Sunday 30 Apr 2017, 8:10 PM WORLD President Donald Trump turns to clap to the audience behind him as he finishes speaking at the Pennsylvania Farm Show Complex, which he attended last night instead of the White House Correspondents’ Dinner. Source: Carolyn Kaster/PA Images#FACE THE NATION: Donald Trump offered some backhanded praise for North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un, calling him “a pretty smart cookie”.#THERESA MAY: The UK Prime Minister said there are “many complex reasons for people going to food banks”, avoiding a question about nurses’ pay.#MCCANNS: The parents of Madeleine McCann said they’re hopeful they will one day be reunited with their daughter as they mark the 10th anniversary of her disappearance.PARTING SHOT Apr 30th 2017, 8:10 PM http://jrnl.ie/3367242 Short URL Peter Curling’s piece. Source: incognito.ieLast weekend, crowds of people queued from 4am to get a chance to buy famous artists’ work for just €50.It was a project by the Jack and Jill Foundation, and it raised thousands of euro that will go towards services for children with serious illnesses.it also gave ordinary people a chance to own art potentially worth thousands, and we’re curious to see what people walked away with.So here’s a glimpse of what was on offer. 15,880 Views NEED TO CATCH up? TheJournal.ie brings you a round-up of today’s news.IRISH Reece Halpin punches the air at The UL Sport Children’s Run for Fun as part of Barrington’s Hospital Great Limerick Run 2017. Source: Sean Curtin/True Media 8 Comments By Gráinne Ní Aodha Tweet thisShare on FacebookEmail this articlelast_img read more

FORMER HAITI LEADER DEAD

first_img Indian Bazaar Owner dies, family flies in from Bombay Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Related Items:baby doc, heart attack, Jean-claude duvalier, port au prince Recommended for you Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppPort au Prince, 04 Oct 2014 – Baby Doc gone at 63. Known “for plunging one of the world’s poorest countries into further despair by presiding over widespread killing, torture and plunder,” Jean-Claude Duvalier died today Oc.tober 4, 2014 at his home in Port au Prince; he had a heart attack.last_img

Rodale CEO to Step Down

first_imgMurphy joined Rodale in 2000 as president and COO.Check back to FOLIOmag.com for updates to this story. Rodale today said president and CEO Steven Pleshette Murphy is stepping down and will leave the company. Chairman Maria Rodale, granddaughter of founder J.I. Rodale, will succeed Murphy as CEO.Rodale’s appointment will be effective September 1.“After a wonderful decade at Rodale, I have decided not to renew my contract and to take time off to pursue my own creative interests,” Murphy [pictured] said in a statement. “I am very proud of our many accomplishments.  Now is the perfect moment for Maria to lead the company forward by adding the top managerial responsibility to her role as chairman.”last_img

Congress asks FCC for emergency briefing on ending location data sales

first_img Share your voice Tags 0 Post a commentcenter_img Rep. Frank Pallone, the House Energy and Commerce committee chair, is asking the FCC to end location data sales from mobile carriers. Toya Sarno Jordan/Getty Images Despite the government shutdown, Congress is calling on the Federal Communications Commission to explain why mobile carriers are still selling customer location data. On Friday, Rep. Frank Pallone, who chairs the House Energy and Commerce committee, asked FCC Chair Ajit Pai for an “emergency briefing” on why the agency hasn’t stopped wireless carriers from selling customer’s real-time location information. He made the request in a letter (PDF). The request for an emergency briefing comes three days after Motherboard reported T-Mobile, AT&T, Sprint and other carriers were allowing third-party data aggregators to sell the sensitive information. On Thursday, AT&T and T-Mobile said they would end sales of location data by March, and Verizon said it was phasing out its last four partnerships. Pallone is asking for a meeting on Jan. 14, even if the government shutdown isn’t over by then. The shutdown, which began Dec. 22, has disrupted services at all federal agencies, including the FCC. Pai canceled his CES appearance because of the shutdown. Despite the disruption, Pallone said the issue was a public safety and national security concern. The committee couldn’t wait for the government to reopen to get answers, he said. “The FCC once again appears to have dragged its feet in protecting consumers,” Pallone said in the letter. “While some carriers have now recommitted to stopping such unauthorized disclosure, the public can no longer rely on their voluntary promises to protect this extremely sensitive information.” Several lawmakers, including Sens. Mark Warner, Kamala Harris and Ron Wyden, have also called for the FCC to investigate this practice.  The FCC didn’t respond to a request for comment. Mobile carriers collect your phone location data and often use it for legitimate services, like roadside assistance and finding lost devices. They also provide this data to advertisers and sometimes lose control of it to third parties. Phones can often show your location with pinpoint accuracy, as well as your travel history, allowing anyone with access to find your home, your workplace and other areas you frequent. Some mobile carriers have promised to end this practice by March, but lawmakers are skeptical. AT&T, Sprint and Verizon made a similar promise last June, but recent developments showed that people could still obtain anyone’s location data. After AT&T made its announcement on Thursday, Wyden said in a statement, “I’ll believe it when I see it.” Pallone, a Democrat from New Jersey, also expressed his skepticism. He’s calling on the FCC to make sure these companies make good on their promise.   “The FCC must take immediate action to ensure no wireless carrier is allowing the rampant disclosure of real-time location data, and take enforcement action against carriers that violated the Commission’s rules and the trust of their customers,” Pallone said. You can read the full letter here:CES 2019: See all of CNET’s coverage of the year’s biggest tech show.Cambridge Analytica: Everything you need to know about Facebook’s data mining scandal. Politics Securitylast_img read more

Zelda spinoff Cadence of Hyrule could launch this week

first_img Preview • Nintendo Switch: All the latest details CNET may get a commission from retail offers. Mentioned Above Nintendo Switch (Gray) Charge your Nintendo Switch over-the-air 2:38 1 29 Photos $289 Now playing: Watch this: See It $299 Review • Nintendo Switch review: Pure fun on a big-screen TV or on the go Previously, NintendoLife had reported that Nintendo included the game in a newsletter showing Switch games that are coming out in May.Cadence of Hyrule is a crossover between Zelda and Crypt of the NecroDancer, which came out in 2015. It’s being made by Brace Yourself, the team behind the latter game.Nintendo is also remaking Link’s Awakening for Nintendo Switch, the company announced in February.The Legend of Zelda: Link’s Awakening top-down game originally launched on the Nintendo Game Boy, and was re-released as a colorized version for the Game Boy Color.It’s set to debut on the Nintendo Switch sometime in 2019. Culture Gaming Video Games Digital Media The 29 best games on the Nintendo Switch Nintendo Switch $299 Best Buy See It Comment News • Are you a Nintendo Switch docker or hander? See it See It Walmart How To • How to transfer your Nintendo Switch account to a new Switch V2 $299 Link is coming back in Cadence of Hyrule. Nintendo The next Legend of Zelda game for the Nintendo Switch could be launching this week.CNET sister site GameSpot found a line in the Nintendo of America website source code for Cadence of Hyrule: Crypt of the NecroDancer Featuring the Legend of Zelda that says, “Release date: May 30, 2019.”Otherwise, the site lists the game — which will be a rhythm-based dungeon crawler — as launching this “spring.” Amazon Share your voice Tags Nintendolast_img read more

Indias 4 smartphone starts shipping on June 30

first_imgWhen Ringing Bells announced their $4 smartphone, they nearly broke the Internet. Now, the phone that sounded like vaporware is nearly ready to ship.Scores of outside observers wondered if the phone would ever even materialize. A fraud investigation was even launched against Ringing Bells, but now they’re ready to deliver the goods. Despite all that, it really is more than just a render in a newspaper ad now. By June 30th, the company will have 200,000 units to ship to their customers.It’s easy enough to see why people were skeptical of a $4 smartphone. Head over to Aliexpress, and the cheapest price you’ll see on a device with a 4-inch touchscreen is around $29 — and many of those run dual-core chips and have just 512MB of storage.The Freedom 251, though, is shipping with a quad-core chip, a gig of RAM, and 8GB of internal storage. It also has an 8MP rear-facing camera, a 3.2MP one for selfies, and dual SIM slots.How do you sell that kind of device for just $4? Keeping the cost of parts down to the absolute minimum is the key, but you also have to be willing to get creative. CEO Mohit Goel says Ringing Bells is doing that by selling the Freedom 251 at a loss of around $2.20.No worries, says Goel. Ringing Bells will make it up on volume. Yes, even though they’re already using parts that are so cheap that they can build the Freedom 251 for just over $6 he figures that shipping a couple million devices will lead to profit — and not just tens of millions of dollars in losses.There’s always the possibility that the company’s losses are being offset another way. They may be subsidized by the government, for example, or through advertising revenue. That, or Goel really is just so bullish on making sure that every Indian citizen can get on the Internet that he’s willing to put the company more than $50 million in in the red to do it.last_img read more

Does your kid reject your political inclinations

first_imgIf your child is not enthusiastic about your political or ideological inclinations, do not be surprised. More than half of all children in the US either misperceive or reject their parents’ political party affiliations, a new study found.The researchers found that more discussion about politics in the home increases the probability that children correctly identify their parents’ party affiliations, but does not increase the likelihood that they will adopt those affiliations. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’“Parent-child communication is a vehicle for delivering information, but it does not always deliver agreement. As we all know, political discussions can sometimes lead to consensus and they can sometimes lead to conflict,” said first author Christopher Ojeda from Stanford University. “Prior to our work, existing research concluded that when parents and children were similar, parents passed on their political values,” said co-author Peter K. Hatemi from Pennsylvania State University. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixHowever, an analysis of two family-based surveys threw up interesting results.In one sample of 8,636 families in the US, 51.2 per cent of children misperceived or rejected their mothers’ political party identification.In the second sample of 3,356 families, 53.5 per cent of children misperceived or rejected their mothers’ political party affiliation, and 54.2 per cent did so for their fathers’ identification.“Both datasets surveyed children in adolescence, young adulthood, and adulthood, thereby capturing the full range of the life course,” Hatemi explained.last_img read more

Mexican berry campaign running well ahead of sched

first_img Mexican berry campaign running well ahead of sched … April 10 , 2019 Mexican mangoes: Slow start but volume and quality … According to the Commission, last year’s most well-liked video of the Commission’s marketing campaign showed footage shot by a drone flying over a California avocado grove.The videos, in addition to other forms of the plan’s media, are set to run from now until after the peak Fourth of July consumption period, in select regions.“With California avocado distribution focused in California and the West this year, it is critical that CAC targets our advertising geographically,” says Jan DeLyser, CAC vice president of marketing.”We are using partners who have fine-tuned location targeting tactics to serve our retail messages,” he adds.Research conducted by Nielsen during the California avocado season last year found the CAC’s approach is working.The study, carried out from April 4 through Sept. 4, compared opinions of consumers exposed to CAC digital advertising (tracked via ad tags) to those in the same markets who were not.Nielson reports: “After campaign exposure, unaided brand awareness increased, and the percent of consumers who said they would recommend California avocados rose significantly to 93 percent.”The Commission also learned that adults with household incomes over $75,000 were directionally more likely to say they preferred avocados grown in California after ad exposure.” South Africa: Maluma Symposium has ‘become a highl … center_img India pushes back U.S. apple tariff rise date … The California Avocado Commission (CAC) has launched a new advertising campaign for the state’s 2019 avocado season, which kicked off in April.It aims to appeal to consumers who drive up category sales the most, labeled by the CAC as “premium Californians” and “super avocado users”.The CAC hopes to reach this demographic with highly targetable media, including its bright “Made of California” graphics, which appear in California outdoor ads as well as digital and social advertising.In the case of its audio advertising, commercials via Spotify let listeners know California avocados are in season, as CAC’s digital content partners broadcast recipe usage ideas and California avocado-specific messaging.Meanwhile, newly created videos on popular streaming platforms, such as Hulu, feature local avocado growers and California avocado groves.As for CAC’s time-honored decision to feature growers and groves in its videos, that move was influenced by its marketing program research. You might also be interested inlast_img read more