Heinrich Calls For Bernalillo County Sheriff To Resign

first_imgU.S. Sen. Martin HeinrichU.S. SENATE News:WASHINGTON, D.C. — U.S. Sen. Martin Heinrich (D-N.M.) issued the following statement calling for the resignation of Bernalillo County Sheriff Manuel Gonzales, III.“Sheriff Gonzales wasn’t representing Bernalillo County when he opposed body cameras. He wasn’t representing Bernalillo County when he opposed efforts for common sense gun violence reforms. And he isn’t with us now.“Instead of collaborating with the Albuquerque Police Department, the Sheriff is inviting the President’s stormtroopers into Albuquerque. If we can learn anything from Portland, it’s that we don’t need this kind of ‘help’ from the White House. The President is currently using federal law enforcement agents like a domestic paramilitary force. That’s precisely how fascism begins and none of us should ever encourage or accept it.“I believe that it is time for Sheriff Gonzales to step aside and make room for someone who will make maintaining the peace and promoting the safety and protection of Bernalillo County residents our law enforcement’s top priority.”last_img read more

Airgas wins CGA’s safety award

first_imgSubscribe Get instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270.last_img

Airgas reports record Q1

first_imgSubscribe Get instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270.last_img

Linde introduces wave-impingement freezer

first_imgGet instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270. Subscribelast_img

Bahri Pens MoU with SEC

first_imgThe National Shipping Company of Saudi Arabia (Bahri) and Saudi Electricity Company (SEC) have signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) for a period of five years, appointing Bahri to transport all the equipment, tools, spare parts and products imported from outside by SEC.The MoU was signed by Engr. Ibrahim Al-Omar, CEO of Bahri and Engr. Ziad Al-Shiha, CEO of SEC.“This is aimed at supporting strategic resettlement of projects for electrical industries and exchange of experiences between the two companies to provide appropriate work environment. This may also contribute to the successful implementation of government plans to promote domestic industries in light of the overall economic boom in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia at all levels in recent years,” Bahri said in a statement.According to the MoU, a joint working group comprising a number of specialists and experts from the two companies will be formed to study opprtunities for cooperation strengthening and to put in place plans needed to implement the strategies for an effective transportation and resettlement of electrical industries.Integrated logistics services for the marine, land and air transportation will be provided as stipulated in the MoU.In line with the MoU, SEC will nominate Bahri to offer its services to those who deal with suppliers and contractors from internally and externally.SEC revealed in May its strategy to localize electrical industries in the Kingdom through three major initiatives based on stimulating local contractors and manufacturers, and highlight investment opportunities in the promotion of spare parts and materials industries locally.last_img read more

Canada to Modernize Port Saint John’s Westside Terminals

first_imgThe governments of Canada and New Brunswick are providing more than CAD 136 million (USD 105.1 million) in funding to modernize Port Saint John’s Westside terminals.The project involves upgrading and consolidating the Rodney and Navy Island terminals to allow the port to accommodate larger vessels.New operational systems and technology will also be installed to enhance cargo-handling capabilities.“Once complete, the work will help ensure the port can support growth and meet increasing demand,” according to the government of Canada.Port Saint John port handles an average of 28 million tonnes of diverse cargo annually and harbours cruise ships in the Canada–New England market.The total estimated cost of this project is CAD 205 million, with CAD 68.3 million coming from the government of Canada through the New Building Canada Fund’s National Infrastructure Component, and CAD 68.3 million coming from the Province of New Brunswick.Port Saint John will cover the remainder of the project costs.last_img read more

IOG extends Blythe license, eyes field development plan

first_imgOil and gas company Independent Oil and Gas (IOG) has extended the license containing the Blythe gas discovery in the Southern North Sea with plans to submit the field development plan before the end of 2016.IOG said on Thursday that, following discussions with the UK Oil & Gas Authority (OGA), the licence for Blocks 48/22b and 48/23a was extended until December 31, 2017.This was the final month of the company’s 15-month license extension agreed with the OGA in August 2015 with the expiration date being December 31, 2016.IOG became the operator and 100 percent owner of the license after agreeing to buy the other 50% of the license from Alpha Petroleum Resources in April this year.According to IOG, Blythe needs no further appraisal and has independently verified gross 2P reserves of 34.3 BCF (6.1 MMBoe).Mark Routh, CEO of IOG, said: “Blythe is at the center of our first gas hub so this license extension is welcomed and is absolutely essential. We are on track to submit a draft Field Development Plan for Blythe before the end of the year.”last_img read more

Employment

first_img Emma Smith (instructed by Beachcrofts (Bristol)) for the appellant; Anna Beale (instructed by Leigh Day & Co) for the respondent. The appellant employer (M) appealed against the employment tribunal’s finding that the respondent former employee (C) had suffered direct ­disability discrimination contrary to section 3A(5) of the Disability Discrimination Act 1995. C was an executive director in an industry which paid high bonuses. He was successful in his work but had been told that he needed to widen his client base. In 2007 C severely injured his back and, as a result, his working hours and ability to entertain possible new clients were significantly reduced. At his appraisal, C was told that he had made a strong showing despite his injury. However, M noted that 65% of C’s revenue still came from one client. C was awarded a much lower bonus than the previous year and was later selected for redundancy. The tribunal found that C had been unfairly dismissed and had suffered direct disability discrimination in relation to his bonus and his dismissal. However, it also found that, in accordance with Malcolm v Lewisham LBC [2008] UKHL 43, [2008] 1 AC 1399, a non-disabled comparator in similar circumstances would have been treated in the same way in relation to bonuses and selection for redundancy. The tribunal consequently dismissed C’s claims for disability-related discrimination under section 3A(1). M submitted that, as the tribunal had found that there was no disability-related discrimination because the Malcolm comparator would have been treated in the same way, there could not, on the same facts, be direct disability discrimination. Held: (1) Although the tribunal could, before considering other ingredients of the statutory tort, ask itself ‘the reason why’ for the alleged discriminatory treatment, a comparator was still required, Shamoon v Chief Constable of the Royal Ulster Constabulary [2003] UKHL 11, [2003] 2 All ER 26 and Bahl v Law Society [2003] IRLR 640 EAT applied. In the instant case, the tribunal had not constructed a comparator so far as direct discrimination was concerned, and had not explained what the discrimination was. The comparator for section 3A(1)(a) was a person in similar circumstances to the claimant who either did not have the claimant’s disability or was not disabled, or where the circumstances of the comparator were unconnected with the claimant’s disability, and Malcolm had rendered the scope of section 3A(1)(a) for all practical purposes to be the same as for direct discrimination under section 3A(5). Therefore, if the case on disability-related discrimination failed, it was difficult to see how the same allegations relied upon in support of that case could found a successful claim for direct discrimination; if the claimant had not demonstrated that he had suffered less-favourable treatment, both claims would fail, Edinburgh City Council v Dickson, unreported, 2 December [2009] EAT (SC) applied. The tribunal therefore appeared to have confused the test of determining direct discrimination under section 3A(5) with the pre-Malcolm test of disability-related discrimination, Malcolm applied. Furthermore, it was unclear whether the tribunal considered there was direct discrimination for reasons other than unfair dismissal, failure to increase the client base and in connection with the bonus. If the tribunal did consider that the direct discrimination related to other matters, it was not clear what those might have been and who would have been the appropriate actual or hypothetical comparator, if not the comparator identified for the purposes of disability-related discrimination. If the tribunal considered that a comparator who had failed to widen his client base would have been treated differently it should have said so. (2) The matter would be remitted to the tribunal to determine whether there had been direct disability discrimination on grounds other than the bonus, dismissal or failure to increase the client base. Appeal allowed. Discrimination – Comparators – Reasons – Unfair dismissalcenter_img JP Morgan Europe Ltd v R Chweidan: EAT (Judge Serota QC, A Gallico, K Mohanty): 26 August 2010last_img read more

Van der Vlist keeps construction on schedule

first_imgEach rig tipped the scales are around 80 tonnes and measured 20 m x 3.5 m x 3.5 m, and were moved to the project site using modular trailers. The machines, which were used by construction contractor Pfahl König to install 3,500 concrete piles, were redelivered to Germany upon completion of the works.Van der Vlist also arranged the delivery of an array of additional parts and tools to the jobsite in 25 separate deliveries.  www.vandervlist.comlast_img

Insurance fund deal for mesothelioma victims

first_imgInsurers will pay £300m over the next 10 years into a scheme to support newly diagnosed victims of mesothelioma, the government confirmed today. The money will go into a new fund for the 3,000 victims across the UK who are unable to claim compensation because they cannot trace a liable employer or employers’ liability insurer. It is estimated that 300 mesothelioma sufferers a year lose out on compensation because they are unable to trace a liable employer or insurer. The deal follows more than two years of negotiations between the Department for Work and Pensions and the Association of British Insurers. Membership of the scheme will be compulsory for all employers’ liability insurers, but will apply only to sufferers diagnosed from today. Otto Thoresen, the ABI’s director general, said: ‘Mesothelioma is a particularly aggressive cancer and the insurance industry, working with government, is determined to do all it can to ensure that sufferers get the support they need as soon as possible. This package of measures will deliver help to claimants much faster, including to those who would otherwise go uncompensated. ‘We appreciate the urgency of this disease, and while implementation depends on legislation being put in place, we hope that the scheme will be up and running and the first payments made by July 2014.’ Since 2011, insurers have operated a voluntary Employers’ Liability Tracing Office (ELTO), which runs an electronic database of insurance policies. This will become compulsory for all EL insurers and include companies who have provided insurance in the past. The DWP has also confirmed that there will be an online portal for all mesothelioma sufferers to register claims and for the parties involved to exchange information to settle claims more quickly. Civil Procedure Rules will to support the use of a pre-action protocol to ensure evidence is disclosed early. The government will improve the way it provides information needed to support claims, including standardized medical diagnosis, employment schedules from HM Revenue and Customs and information on state benefits from the DWP.last_img read more